Come Away, Come Away!

"Do you know," Peter asked, "why swallows build in the eaves of houses? It is to listen to the stories."


“Philadelphia, the late 1870s. A city of gas lamps, cobblestone streets, and horse-drawn carriages—and home to the controversial surgeon Dr. Spencer Black. The son of a grave robber, young Dr. Black studies at Philadelphia’s esteemed Academy of Medicine, where he develops an unconventional hypothesis: What if the world’s most celebrated mythological beasts—mermaids, minotaurs, and satyrs—were in fact the evolutionary ancestors of humankind.” 



The Resurrectionist brings new life to an age of enlightenment, discovery, and revelation.  As readers follow Dr. Spencer Black’s grotesquely impassioned and incessant study of the metamorphosis of mythological creatures, we also witness the evolution of Black’s own macabre transformation.  Accompanying the fictional biography of Dr. Black is a scientific masterpiece so detailed and thorough that the book could rival any factual, biological text.  The breadth and depth of the knowledge and information provided, as well as the comprehensive anatomical architecture of each creature is simply stunning.  With the book’s freshness and originality, Hudspeth has redefined the boundaries of modern literature.
In the same vein as his literary predecessors, Dr. Frankenstein and Dr. Jekyll, Dr. Black’s scientific dexterity crosses the line between genius and insanity.  While reminiscing on past literary themes shared by writers like Shelley and Stevenson, The Resurrectionist reminds the reader why those works, as well as this new, reinvented story, haunts and resonates in the depth’s of one’s soul.  The battle between man and nature is timeless – man’s innate curiosity of nature, man’s attempt to alter the natural order, and nature’s eventual victory over man, life, and death.  It is perhaps Dr. Black’s own words that best describe the treasures exhumed by the readers, as the book presents “an opportunity to see beyond yourself, beyond your small world and science.”  The novelty and brilliance that seeps through every page of this work revives the idea that no discovery would have or will ever be made in the absence of imagination, innovation, and creativity.  

“Philadelphia, the late 1870s. A city of gas lamps, cobblestone streets, and horse-drawn carriages—and home to the controversial surgeon Dr. Spencer Black. The son of a grave robber, young Dr. Black studies at Philadelphia’s esteemed Academy of Medicine, where he develops an unconventional hypothesis: What if the world’s most celebrated mythological beasts—mermaids, minotaurs, and satyrs—were in fact the evolutionary ancestors of humankind.”

The Resurrectionist brings new life to an age of enlightenment, discovery, and revelation.  As readers follow Dr. Spencer Black’s grotesquely impassioned and incessant study of the metamorphosis of mythological creatures, we also witness the evolution of Black’s own macabre transformation.  Accompanying the fictional biography of Dr. Black is a scientific masterpiece so detailed and thorough that the book could rival any factual, biological text.  The breadth and depth of the knowledge and information provided, as well as the comprehensive anatomical architecture of each creature is simply stunning.  With the book’s freshness and originality, Hudspeth has redefined the boundaries of modern literature.

In the same vein as his literary predecessors, Dr. Frankenstein and Dr. Jekyll, Dr. Black’s scientific dexterity crosses the line between genius and insanity.  While reminiscing on past literary themes shared by writers like Shelley and Stevenson, The Resurrectionist reminds the reader why those works, as well as this new, reinvented story, haunts and resonates in the depth’s of one’s soul.  The battle between man and nature is timeless – man’s innate curiosity of nature, man’s attempt to alter the natural order, and nature’s eventual victory over man, life, and death.  It is perhaps Dr. Black’s own words that best describe the treasures exhumed by the readers, as the book presents “an opportunity to see beyond yourself, beyond your small world and science.”  The novelty and brilliance that seeps through every page of this work revives the idea that no discovery would have or will ever be made in the absence of imagination, innovation, and creativity.  

  • 29 April 2013
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